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RHSA-2003:190: Updated 2.4 kernel for pSeries and iSeries fixes vulnerabilities

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RHSA-2003:190: Updated 2.4 kernel for pSeries and iSeries fixes vulnerabilities

Severity
7
CVSS
(AV:L/AC:L/Au:N/C:C/I:C/A:C)
Published
03/31/2003
Created
07/25/2018
Added
10/28/2005
Modified
07/04/2017

Description

Updated kernel packages, based on the 2.4.18 kernel, are now available for Red Hat Linux 7.1 for iSeries and pSeries systems. Please see the NOTE at the end of the description for important information about booting the new kernel on your system.

The Linux kernel handles the basic functions of the operating system. A number of security issues have been found which affect the version of the Linux kernel shipped for iSeries and pSeries systems: Al Viro found a security issue in the tty layer whereby any user could cause a kernel oops. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CAN-2002-0247 to this issue. Multiple Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) device drivers do not pad frames with null bytes. This allows remote attackers to obtain information from previous packets or kernel memory by using malformed packets. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CAN-2003-0001 to this issue. The kernel module loader allows local users to gain root privileges by using ptrace to attach to a child process that is spawned by the kernel. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CAN-2003-0127 to this issue. A flaw has been found in several hash table implementations in the kernel networking code. A remote attacker could send packets with carefully chosen, forged source addresses in such a way as to make every routing cache entry get hashed into the same hash chain. The result would be that the kernel would use a disproportionate amount of processor time to deal with new packets, resulting in a remote denial of service attack. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the names CAN-2003-0244 and CAN-2003-0364 to these issues. NOTE: Installing the kernel RPMs will not automatically prepare the system to boot the new kernel. Refer to the following sections for the appropriate instructions to boot the new kernel on your machine. Preparing to boot the new kernel on iSeries: After the kernel RPM is installed, the new kernel image file is /boot/vmlinux. This is a link to the /boot/vmlinux-"version" file (where "version" is the new kernel's version-release). Use the installkernel.iSeries command to load the new kernel image into the "side" from which you want to boot. For instance, to boot from the C side, use the command: installkernel.iSeries C /boot/vmlinux Preparing to boot the new kernel on pSeries: After the kernel RPM is installed, the new kernel image file is /boot/vmlinux. This is a link to the /boot/vmlinux-"version" file (where "version" is the new kernel's version-release). Edit the /etc/yaboot.conf file to instruct YABOOT to boot the new kernel. Add a new stanza or change the existing stanza to point to the new kernel image file. The yaboot.conf man page has detailed information about the format of the yaboot configuration file.

Solution(s)

  • redhat-upgrade-cross-ppc64-binutils
  • redhat-upgrade-cross-ppc64-gcc
  • redhat-upgrade-iptables
  • redhat-upgrade-iptables-ipv6
  • redhat-upgrade-kernel-doc
  • redhat-upgrade-kernel-iseries
  • redhat-upgrade-kernel-pseries
  • redhat-upgrade-kernel-source
  • redhat-upgrade-modutils
  • redhat-upgrade-modutils-devel

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